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Fat Head ~ You’ve been fed load of Bologna: A Review

It is rare when you can find someone that will stand up in the face of all the so-called experts and call them out for what they are actually sell. One such man is Tom Naughton.

You HAVE been fed a load of bologna, and he has set out to change that.

I recently came into possession of an advance copy of his documentary, “Fat Head: You’ve been fed a load of bologna!” It was an entertaining, educative 104 minutes. I even watched the bonus interviews that weighed in at another 30+ minutes. That is rare for me.

So, what is this documentary all about? The documentary strips away all the hype about the current trend of low-fat, high grain diets. The premise is simple: we have been led to believe that what we have eaten for millenia as a human race is wrong, and contributes to the “rising pandemic” of obesity. The past statement is a load of bologna, and the next hour and a half will show you why.

The documentary starts off by picking apart another famous documentary, “Super Size Me” by showing the obvious holes in the Spurlockian theory. To prove his point, Tom actually followed a fast food diet, AND followed the rules. The results are startling to watch.

The rest of the film goes into how we have been duped over the last 30-40 years over the issue of saturated fats vs vegetable fats. Several scientist share their discoveries on just how the current nutritional trend is actually causing our high rates of heart attacks and type II diabetes.

How does this film compare to that Other Film about the “Golden Arches?” One thing I can say about the Spurlockian effort that turned me off was the dramatics. This film has none of that. Take this example:

Spulock ate a Double Quarter Pounder with Cheese and threw up. I remember thinking, “What a wuss. I would go back for a second!” Tom munches away on the CSPI’s nightmare on a bun, and is strangely okay! Things that make you go hmmm… or MMmmm!

What this documentary does is deliver the message in a lighthearted comedic way. Make no mistake though; the message is clearly stated and backed up.

All in all, not only is this film educational, it is also enjoyable to watch. As a chef, I wholeheartedly recommend this title. Perhaps it will change your perceptions about what you eat, what is good for you, and give you back what you need. Fat=Flavor!


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  • Patrick_M

    The film contains a decent introduction to the emerging science championed by Taubes and others about the mechanisms of fats, carbs, and sugars in connection with weight gain and coronary disease. But the presentation includes exactly nobody to defend the conventional medical wisdom, and is consistently dragged down by Naughton’s gratuitous anti-government libertarian political views, even including an editor at “Reason” magazine alongside the doctors and research scientists who discuss the science.

    Naughton goes so far as to argue that people living in poverty have higher rates of obesity due to a supposed genetic predisposition of non-whites toward “thicker bodies” and he links higher weight among the young to court-ordered school busing to achieve desegregation. His attempts at humor are consistently juvenile (questioning people on the street if eating fettucine alfredo caused them to suffer a heart attack immediately thereafter) and his rambling attack on “Supersize Me” is mostly incoherent and an unnecessary distraction to the argument about the role of saturated fat vs. carbs and sugars. Obviously, whether one is on a low carb diet or a low fat diet, the typical McDonalds meal is not an optimal choice.

    I do share the conclusion that conventional medical understanding on saturated fat and cholesterol is wrong (or at least flawed and incomplete), and I had hoped Fat Head would provide a clean and sharp presentation of the alternative view. Unfortunately the film wastes so much time “debunking” Spurlock, defending the fast food industry, and obsessing over a conspiracy theory involving a coalition of “radical” vegetarians, “big government,” and the medical and scientific community, that the Fat Head Naughton may well alienate as many viewers as he persuades.